Hanbok in Chuseok

“Chuseok” means Thanksgiving Day in Korea. It is one of the biggest and most important holidays that Koreans celebrate.

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This three-day holiday is also a celebration of good harvest festival. Traditionally Koreans visit their ancestral hometowns and families come together to share food.

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For foreigners living and working in Korea, this holiday is one of the most anticipated one as it is a long break from those hard works. Often they wander around Korea with their friends.

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For Filipinos in South Korea (FILIPOS), they celebrated the first day of Chuseok on their photo walk at Gyeongbukgung Palace wearing the Korean traditional dress, Hanbok.

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Gyeongbuk palace, was the main royal palace during the Joseon dynasty. It is the largest among the five grand palaces in Korea: Changdeokgung, Changgyeonggung, Deoksugung, Gyeonghuigung and Gyeongbokgung.

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Wearing hanbok and walking around the palaces is one of a great experience that you may try when in Korea. It feels like you’re part of their formidable history.

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You can visit Gyeongbokgung any day of the week, but if you want to experience a special visit, though that will be a lot of visitors I’m sure, you must choose the date of those special holidays.

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Multi cultural family.

Why? Simply, because a lot of these palace visitors will wear a special Korean traditional dress and that will complete the ambiance of this historic landmark and will make your visit a really good one.

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The King and Queen.

Hanbok rentals are available near the palace vicinity, but ours was rented at Hanbok Plus Shop which can be found at exit 2 of Gyeongbokgung station, line 3.

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Filipos in Hanbok.

Gyeongbokgung is located at exit 5 (about 2 minutes walk) of Gyeongbukgung station, line 3 or Gwangwhamun station.

Enjoy the rest of Chuseok holidays!

 

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2 thoughts on “Hanbok in Chuseok

  1. Pingback: Fall foliage in South Korea | When In South Korea

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